“A Letter from a Working Mother to a Stay-At-Home Mother, and vice versa” by Carolyn Ee

I read a blog post titled “A Letter from a Working Mother to a Stay-At-Home Mother, and vice versa” written by the talented Carolyn Ee when I was about 7 months pregnant and my husband and I were still deciding if I was going to work full-time, work part-time or stay home after the birth of our baby boy.  We eventually decided that the best option for our family was for me to work part-time, and I’m lucky enough to work for a company that supported our decision.  I still wonder every single day if I’m doing the right thing.  Is this what is best for my son and our family?  Is he happy going to daycare 3 days a week?  Does he have fun with the other children?  Is he safe in the care of our daycare provider?  Is our extra income truly worth it?  Will he be proud of me for having a career?  Will I ever stop missing him when I’m sitting at my desk?  Will he admire my work ethic or will he resent me?  Will I ever stop feeling guilty?  Will it ever get easier?  Etc., etc., etc.  I go back and forth and question our decision constantly but the fact of the matter is, I don’t know.  I don’t know the answer to any of those questions.  All I can do is my best.  It’s really that simple.  I just have to trust that everything will work itself out and hope that my son feels loved and safe.  Everything I do, I do for him.  Every decision I make is in his best interest.  I love him so much and I would do anything to make sure he is safe, happy and healthy.  It’s hard.  Being a mom is hard and it’s hard whether you work or stay home because let’s face it, staying home is still work.  There are positives and negatives to working vs. not working.  I can relate to both scenarios because I’m home 4 days a week and I work 3 days a week and they are totally different situations but each one is better and worse in their own specific ways.  We are all mothers trying our very best to raise our children to be good people.  These little humans look up to us and they don’t see a doctor or a lawyer, they don’t see a maid or a chef, they don’t see a stay-at-home mom versus a working mom, all they see is a mom.  Just a mom.  Their mom.  That’s so wonderful all in itself.  Don’t be so hard on yourselves, mommas, and don’t be so hard on other mommas either.  We are all doing our best and we are all struggling.  Love your children and do what you feel is best for them.  Children are amazing little creatures and they love us.  The best decision we can make as mothers is to love them back, wholeheartedly.

This blog post was an emotional read for me but it helped me understand and appreciate each position.  Enjoy the read, Mommas.

internetteatime

“Dear Stay-At-Home Mum

Some people have been questioning what you do at home all day. I know what you do. I know because I’m a mum and for a while I did it too.

I know you do unpaid work, often thankless work, which starts the moment you wake up, and doesn’t even end when you go to sleep. I know you work weekends and nights, with no discernible end to your day or working week. I know the rewards are joyous but few.

I know that you seldom have a hot cup of coffee or tea. I know that your attention is always divided, often diverted from a moment to moment basis, and you cannot ever count on completing a task in the one go. I know that you probably don’t get any down time when you’re on your own at home, unless you have a single child who still naps in the daytime.

I know the challenges you deal with daily, usually with no peer support or backup. The toddler tantrums, the toilet training accidents, the food battles, the food on the floor, the crayons on the wall, the sibling rivalry, the baby that never seems to stop crying. I know how the work seems incessant, like an endless cycle – you shop for food, prepare it, cook it, attempt to feed it to your children, clean it off the floor, wash the dishes, and repeat in three hours.

I know you fantasise about having an hour to yourself to eat your lunch in peace, or about having an afternoon nap. I know you sometimes wonder if it’s all worth it, and feel envious of your friends who are having coffee breaks at work. I know that sometimes when your partner gets home in the evening after his work is done, he wants to put his feet up exactly when you need a break the most, and this can bring you to tears.

I know that you are misunderstood by so many who do not appreciate the difficulties of caring for small children on your own, all day, and refer to you as joining the “latte set”. They imagine you spend your day sipping coffee while your children play quietly. I know you miss your financial independence. I know you feel amused and sometimes annoyed when others proclaim “TGIF!” because to you every day is the same – there is no Friday, no break from your job. I know that many people do not understand that you work – you simply work an unpaid job at home.

SAHM, I don’t know how you do it. I admire your infinite patience, your ability to face each day cheerfully and bring joy into your children’s lives even when they wear you down. I admire your dedication to being a constant presence in your children’s lives even if it isn’t always easy. I admire the way you work without expecting any reward – no promotions, no fame, no salary. I know you want your children to feel important and loved, and SAHM, you do this the best.

I just wanted you to know that I understand. We’re both mothers. And I know.

Love from the trenches

Working Mum

 

Dear Working Mum

I know you sometimes get judged by others for leaving your children in the care of others to work. Some people imply that you don’t love your children as much as us SAHMs do, and that it’s best for children to be at home with their mothers.

How can they say this about you? I know you love your children just as much as any other mother. I know that going back to work was no easy decision. You weighed up the pros and cons, long before you conceived a baby. It has always been one of the most important decisions of your life. You thought about this even while you were in high school and were choosing subjects for Grade 11.

I see you everywhere. You are the doctor I take my children to when they are sick. You’re my child’s allergist, the one who diagnosed her peanut allergy. You’re the physiotherapist who treated my husband’s back. You’re the accountant who does our tax returns. My son’s primary school teacher. The director of our childcare centre. My daughter’s gymnastics teacher. The real estate agent who sold our house. What sort of world would it be if you hadn’t been there for us? If you had succumbed to the pressures of those who insisted a mother’s place had to be in the home?

I know you weigh up every job to see if it will suit your family. I know you wake up an hour before everyone else does, just so you can get some exercise done or some quiet time. I know that you have attended meetings after being up all night with your toddler. I know that when you come home in the evening, your “second shift” begins. The nay-sayers don’t understand that you run a household AND hold a job. You come home, cook dinner, bath your children and read them stories. You tuck them in and kiss them goodnight. You pay the bills, do the grocery shopping, the laundry, the dishes, just like every other mother does.

I know that you often feel guilty about having any more time away from your children so you sacrifice your leisure time. I know you can’t bring yourself to take a “day off” for yourself when your children are at daycare. I know you accept that work is your “time off” for now. I know that when you are at work you don’t waste a single minute. I know you eat your lunch at your desk, you don’t go out for coffee, and you show complete dedication and concentration to your job. You chose to be there after all. You want to be there.

I know how discerning you are about who is looking after your children, and that many long daycare centres offer excellent care. I know you only leave your children in a place where you confident they are loved and well looked after. I know that you spend many days caring for your children at home when they are sick, and sacrifice your pay. I know that you secretly enjoy these days, and revel in being able to be with your children.

I know that sometimes you feel guilty about not being there all the time. But WM, I know this. You are setting a wonderful example to your children. You are showing them that a woman can have a career, contribute in some way outside the home, and still be a loving mother. You are showing your daughters that they can do anything they want to do in life. You are displaying strength, endurance, dedication, tenacity, and you do it with so much joy and love.

I just wanted you to know I understand. Because we’re both mothers.

Love from the trenches

Stay-At-Home Mum”

 

**I was given permission by the original author of this blog post, Carolyn Ee, to repost.  Check out “The Healthy Doctor” at http://carolynee.net/.

 

Talk to you soon

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4 thoughts on ““A Letter from a Working Mother to a Stay-At-Home Mother, and vice versa” by Carolyn Ee

  1. I’m so glad you shared these 2 letters, they are both so touching to read.
    To be a WM or SAHM sometimes is not a choice and I truly believe that beneath the decision is a mother’s unconditional love for her children.

    Liked by 1 person

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